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B.QullecTivE

A community organization for Queer and Trans People of Color in Minnesota

So I have a fundraiser going on & I really need your help →

janetmock:

mermaidsinwondaland:

Hi y’all! I’m a 20 year old transwoman from Boston. Recently, I lost my job and currently babysitting to try and pay my bills.Trying to pay all my medical bills, buy my medicine, and pay my college bill on 120 a week is not the most realistic or easy thing to do ( not to mention buying food,…

Help a young TWoC sista out by giving and/or reblogging! 

incogneeco:

bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

Here’s what I got from the Facebook:

OUT IN THE NIGHT (formerly titled The Fire This Time) follows the journey of a group of African American teenagers who went to a gay-friendly neighborhood in New York City for a night out. These lesbian and gender non-conforming friends, Patreese, Renata, Terrain and Venice, were confronted by an older man on the street. They defended themselves. Strangers jumped in to support them and a fight ensued. Only the women were rounded up by police and charged and convicted as perpetrators of gang assault. They became known as The New Jersey 4.OUT IN THE NIGHT follows their journey to Rikers Island, to the courtroom, and through slanderous media coverage that labeled them a “Wolfpack” and “Lesbian Gang”. While exploring the fight from all sides through the security camera footage that captured it, that hot August night in 2006 can be seen from many perspectives. But our film’s purpose is to examine the events after the fight: biased media coverage likening the women to “man-hating” animals, and unprecedentedly harsh sentencing by the court. This story shows how four young, queer women of color were unfairly criminalized for defending themselves.

It’s currently running the film festival circuit, but you can keep checking the website for new screenings: www.outinthenight.com

incogneeco:

bklynboihood:

meandmybois:

#OUTINTHENIGHT #NJ4

Anyone got deets on this film?

Here’s what I got from the Facebook:

OUT IN THE NIGHT (formerly titled The Fire This Time) follows the journey of a group of African American teenagers who went to a gay-friendly neighborhood in New York City for a night out. These lesbian and gender non-conforming friends, Patreese, Renata, Terrain and Venice, were confronted by an older man on the street. They defended themselves. Strangers jumped in to support them and a fight ensued. Only the women were rounded up by police and charged and convicted as perpetrators of gang assault. They became known as The New Jersey 4.

OUT IN THE NIGHT follows their journey to Rikers Island, to the courtroom, and through slanderous media coverage that labeled them a “Wolfpack” and “Lesbian Gang”. While exploring the fight from all sides through the security camera footage that captured it, that hot August night in 2006 can be seen from many perspectives. But our film’s purpose is to examine the events after the fight: biased media coverage likening the women to “man-hating” animals, and unprecedentedly harsh sentencing by the court. This story shows how four young, queer women of color were unfairly criminalized for defending themselves.

It’s currently running the film festival circuit, but you can keep checking the website for new screenings: www.outinthenight.com

(via thugprincesa)

Transgender love song becomes a viral hit online in Thailand with 9 million views →

snow-anne:

starlingsongs:

unobject:

secondstringheroine:

This evening I had the misfortune to hear “Transgender Woman Never Cheats” by Thai artist Vid Hiper Rsiam.

According to Gay Star News the song tells the story of “a transgender woman who reunites with her best friend she fell in love with as a teenage boy”; but is in actuality the visual representation of a trans woman struggling with her affection toward a one time (and now again) aggressor.

The clip tells two stories featuring the main characters side by side; one set in the past, and one in the present.

In the past a young girl (who appears male at the time) pines for her friend (a cis man) as they share good times together. They ride bikes, they hang out, they even get matching tattoos. After he confides in her and falls asleep, the young woman leans over to kiss him. When he wakes he is furious, attacks her, leaves her face bloody and then stands to kick her while she is down.

Despite this the two are still upset when one has to move away. The narrative implies they are left without the chance to reconcile.

The present day story sees the two main characters (with the woman now presenting as herself) unknowingly reunite. They sleep together, part ways, then return for bed upon a chance meeting. During the second encounter he sees her tattoo and they learn of their past relationship. The man is infuriated and repeatedly pushes her away, even bloodying her head in the process. He raises his fist to hurt her, but sees affection in her eyes.

At the end of the clip his anger eases and they smile to one another.

This, apparently, is a love song.

The title of the song says it all: “Transgender Woman Never Cheats.” In that alone there are myriad implications which, while appearing to be passive, sympathetic and well meaning, makes a generalization about the loyalty of trans women to their partners. In any other context this might be considered a virtuous stereotype, but when applied to a story about a woman who is beaten and abused, loyalty in spite of herself is a dangerous and misguided thing.

Her gaze toward an abusive figure is sold as endearing and as a form of enduring love that sees beyond the violence he inflicts upon her. Throughout the narrative she is understanding of him, patient, and puts her own safety aside for the sake of his coming to terms with who she is. When he does harm to her she excuses it, accepts it as normal for a man who feels conflicted, and is waiting with open arms when his anger settles.

For the women who’ve been in similar situations, counting on the rage of an abuser to subside is not a certainty. For that idea to be sold on a mass media platform is a dangerous and irresponsible thing.

The message to trans women has long been made clear; that revulsion is the ‘normal’ reaction to our existence, that recognition of our beauty is cast into the land of fetish, that violence toward us is expected, and that our affection toward other human beings (in particular cisgender men) is justification for our being murdered.

There is no fault to be laid on women who have feelings for violent partners, but to call the violence part of a “love story” is a gross idealization of what no individual deserves from a relationship.

what a perfect example of the kind of shit we were talking about. yeah, thats totally  not like really explicit serve the men shit and trans women totally dont get this shit all the fucking time our entire lives starting from when were young, on top of all the other misogyny everywhere. /bitter sarcasam

Look at these pathetic fucking notes. You’d be reblogging your asses off if this was another one about a cis woman. But you won’t see blowback for this shit going viral like it did for blurred lines, we just aren’t important enough.

Message: “Trans women, we found a niche for you to fit into as viable partners: find an abusive jerk, smile at every punch he throws, and your stockholm-syndrome-like loyalty will have us so endeared that we’ll look past your transness.”

(via thebigblackwolfe)

fuckyeahqueermusic:

returnthegayze:

@DarkMatterRage is #NotProud of the co-optation of Pride and the depoliticization of the white cis gay agenda.

Solidarity to all the trans, queer, PoC, &/ low income folks experiencing micro and macro agressions this Pride season. Keep the resistance alive!

To continue the conversation follow DarkMatter on Twitter and Facebook

Literally the theme of this year’s pride in NYC is “Yesterday’s Struggle Is Today’s Heritage.”

So yeah.

(via fabulazerstokill)

thebigblackwolfe:

strugglingtobeheard:

jcoleknowsbest:

thinkspeakstress:

pleadingthefilth:

popca:

zebablah:

icecreamritual:

WIFEY

i don’t think i will ever recover from this

flawless

i want to be this amazing tho

I cannot handle all of the life I just received 

OMG YAS, YASSSSSSSS TO THE HUNNITH POWAH OMG!!!! Chile you ain’t NEVER seen voguing like this in your whole damn life!

yaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa

aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasssssssssss

ssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssssss

omg, this is werq! so sexy too

omggggggggg i got my life

(via sistahmamaqueen)

labrujamorgan:

labrujamorgan:

This my speech that I did for CLPP! 

realized that posting a transcript of the speech might be a good idea :) 

——-

I remember the first time I it really hit me that I would never bear children. It was six months into my transition and I was at a pizza parlor, waiting for my order. They were playing Fox News on the TV and some talking heads were blathering on about abortion restrictions. And the thought just came out of nowhere. I would never be able to birth a child. Sure, I could freeze some of my sperm and perhaps in some hazy future a child would be born with my genetic material but it would never come from me. I would never feel the baby’s first kick in my belly nor would I endure the pain of labor. And the thought filled me with sadness. I collapsed into a chair and just started to cry.

            I’m sure the new hormones coursing through me had a lot to do with my strong emotional reaction, (this was not the first unexpected emotional outburst I had in those early months), but the question of family making is one that has stuck with me all of these years. What does it mean to build a family when you will probably never have children? What does it mean to build family when girls like me are being killed before their 30s? What does it mean to build family when elders are rare or unseen? What does it mean to build family in a world that constantly seeks to erase your history, your pain, your triumphs? What does it mean to build family where even in radical queer communities transmisogyny is rampant and unchecked? What does it mean to build family when desire is so hard to come by?

Lets not get it twisted. Trans women of color are the most beautiful and perfect of Goddess’s creatures. But desire for us is kept secret. You don’t build families with girls like us. You don’t take girls like us to meet your mother. You don’t take girls like us down the aisle. And this isn’t just cis men I’m talking about. Cis lesbians are just as quick to say that desire for trans women is strange (but strangely they don’t seem to feel the same way about trans men, because its all about vagina right?). Sexual agency, who is deemed desirable and who is deemed disposable are reproductive issues. Desire for girls like us can get us killed. We are at the same time hypervisible, hypersexual, and yet completely ignored when you cut the lights on. Desire does not exist in a vacuum and it is so crucial that we interrogate what kind of bodies we find attractive and what kind of bodies repulse us. It is important that we understand how desirability can lead to access and how lack of desirability or shame of desirability can lead to violence.

            Violence against trans women of color is a reproductive issue. We are unable to build families because of state violence, because of we don’t have access to transition related care, because our economic opportunities are limited, because most girls like me are killed before they reach 25. Put simply, if trans women of color cannot reproduce because of the violence that we face, than it is a reproductive issue. If we cannot build the network of people and community that constitutes a family because of the transmisogyny we face, than it is a reproductive issue. If we cannot find people who will cherish us and desire us for who we are, than it is a reproductive issue. If we cannot survive, if cannot thrive, than it is a reproductive issue.

            Audre Lorde says, “Poetry is not only a dream or a vision; it is the skeleton architecture of our lives. It lays the foundations for a future of change, a bridge across our fears of what has never been before.” So it is in the spirit of that quote that I leave with you with this.

Dreams

Dreams drifting

Dreams drifting down

Dreams drifting down my lover’s

Back

Wards

Reaching across the bridge

Ancestors breathing up

Soul

For my baby unborn

For my sister living rough

For my auntie lost in the old days

For my mother struggling to get back home

For you

Indiegna

Muerta pero viviendo aqui

En las lineas de my palma

I build for you

I live for you

There are days

Hard days

Days where my underwear

Scratches the inside of my thighs

Days where my makeup

Burns the soft creases of my lips

Days where my hands shake

And nothing feels right

These days

I remember to breathe

Feel the soft core

See the smooth veins cording over

My skin

I am alive

Girls like me only have one ending

And I am still shocked

Every birthday

My lover asks me

How does your story end today

I close my eyes

Surf beating on the shore

The smell of fresh turned earth

Laughter

Sunlight on my cheek

Lips full of papaya

Surrounded by the family

We built together

Resting.

               

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